Fisherman’s cabin – Rorbu – ‘ro’ (row) and ‘bu’ (live) were originally accommodation for travelling fishermen during the seasonal Arctic Cod fishing.
Valentine’s wonderful Salted Cod ‘Red and Green’ is a thrilling combination of Mexican Contramar style and Lofoten’s arctic elements.
If you’re one of those dreading the winter season and feel like it’s never going to end we’ve written down everything we could think of that makes this dark and cold time of year warm and bright.
Today we’re sharing head chef Rich’s tasty sauerkraut recipe with beetroot and horseradish. Sauerkraut – or ‘surkål’ (literally meaning sour cabbage) as we call it in Norwegian – is the perfect pairing to many of the winter roasts we enjoy here.
We’re currently drooling over chef’s ‘Aquavit Eccles Cake’, a perfect little treat to welcome friends and family to your home over the festive period. Why not make a batch yourself?
Sea Urchin – kråkebolle – are abundant in the Northeast Atlantic, and are often overlooked as a food source. The good news is that the urchin’s roe is a delicacy and can be eaten raw; straight from the ocean.
Med inspirasjon fra havet, våre fantastiske omgivelser og årstidens elementer, inviterer vi til en nostalgisk gjenforening med det som gjør julen så spesiell her i Lofoten.
With the arrival of autumn and a weather that’s shifting hour by hour there’s nothing we Norwegian’s love more than to enjoy a hearty soup inside.
Warming, made with local fruit and with the kick of traditional aquavit, there’s nothing quite like cozying up or hunkering down with a glass (or two) of gløgg after a day out in the elements.
It’s an early spring morning, the 6th of March, 1890. Hundreds of fishermen have gathered around the inlet of the fjord, ready to claim their right of the arctic cod that’s lurking inside. But they can’t get inside…
Where the fresh wind blows white horses towards sharp black mountains that fall steeply to the sea, where giant cod swim deep below the sharp eyes of circling sea eagles, the moss-carpeted Lofoten islands sit in the far northerly west of Norway below Tromsø, ninety-five miles north of the Arctic Circle.
If you have ever visited Holmen Lofoten before, you might have noticed a tall man, with wild curls, usually holding a cup of coffee in his hands. His name is Håvar, meaning guardian in old Norse.
Blacksmith Alex Pole’s account of his first visit to Holmen. “I don’t think you ever forget your first sight of Holmen…”
Sny is the Lofoten word for snow. In Norway, we actually have almost 100 different expressions for this word.